Transitions: Anaheim, CA; Livermore, CA; Rockwall, TX

Anaheim, California (population 365,463): Anaheim’s city manager, who has served in the position for more than two years, announced on Wednesday that he was resigning. Tom Wood’s decision comes on the heels of the City Council telling him they want a management change. City spokeswoman Ruth Ruiz says in a news release that the five-member City Council met in closed session on Tuesday and told Wood the city wants to move in a different direction. Wood’s resignation will be effective starting Dec. 8 and he will be paid about $124,000 for the remaining six months on his contract. Wood, who oversees a $1.3 billion budget, said in a statement that he leaves Anaheim with a balanced budget, significant reserves and low crime rates. The Orange County Register reports that Wood also expressed frustrations in the statement. The Register writes Wood is often credited with helping expand the Anaheim resort area around Disneyland and leading the charge to bring the Sacramento Kings to Anaheim. Wood has had over 20 years experience working with Anaheim’s management team, serving as deputy city manager, assistant city manager and, ultimately, city manager. Mayor Tom Tait released a statement thanking Wood for his service with the city, but he didn’t elaborate on the reason for pushing Wood out. Read more at KPCC

City spokeswoman Ruth Ruiz says in a news release that the five-member City Council met in closed session on Tuesday and told City Manager Tom Wood the city wants to move in a different direction. Wood, who has been the city manager for more than two years, announced on Wednesday that he was resigning, effective Dec. 8. He will be paid about $124,000 for the remaining six months on his contract.
Read more at the San Francisco Examiner.

Livermore, California (population 80,968): Marc Roberts, the community development director for the City of Livermore, is scheduled to be appointed the new city manager at Monday’s city council meeting. A city report said Roberts was chosen out of 12 applicants. If the council approves the staff recommendation, Roberts would assume his new post on Jan. 3, 2012. City officials began a search for a new city manager when Linda Barton announced her retirement in September. She has served 10 years as Livermore’s city manager. Roberts has worked for the City of Livermore for 24 years. A city staff report shows how Roberts has played a key role in several projects that have helped to transform Livermore: City officials say the initial salary for the city’s manager position is $196,320. Read more at the Livermore Patch.

Rockwall, Texas (population 78,337): The city of Rockwall is looking for a new city manager now that the city council has voted its current city manager out. Rockwall City Council approved a motion to terminate City Manager Julie Couch’s contract. The council decided on the motion in a 5-to-2 vote against Couch’s employment. Couch started her career with the city in 1979 as an administrative assistant. She appointed city manager in 1993. Assistant city manager Rick Crowley has been appointed the interim city manager. The resolution will be considered at the next meeting scheduled for November 21. Read more at WFAA.

Newport, Rhode Island (population 24,672): A Montana woman could soon be moving to Newport to take over the city’s operations. The Newport City Council announced Wednesday, Nov. 9,  that Jane Howington was offered the position as the next city manager, which would be effective Jan. 9, 2012, according to a release from Mayor Stephen C. Waluk. She will be the 12th city manager of Newport and is the first woman to assume the role. Howington currently is the city manager of Kalispell, Montana, where she has worked in that role since 2009. She has also worked as the assistant city manager for operations in Dayton, Ohio, and served as city manager of Oxford, Ohio. Howington also served in municipal positions in three Massachusetts communities. Kalispell is similar to Newport in that the two cities rely on tourism, Councilor Charles Y. Duncan said. While Newport brings in tourists during the summer, Kalispell has a high winter tourist population. This past August, the city council began a nationwide search for a replacement for City Manager Edward F. Lavallee, who will retire on Dec. 31. The council’s seven-member resume-screening committee reviewed 119 applications for the position. The council interviewed six of the most qualified candidates in October, then offered Howington the position on Oct. 30 after a second round of interviews. The number of applicants says a good thing about Newport, Waluk said, since he did not know of any other city that saw more than 100 applications for city manager positions. Applicants were not just the unemployed, but many people in other jobs who wanted to relocate to Newport. Waluk said it was Howington’s experience in several cities and towns that sold her as Newport’s next city manager. Councilor Naomi Neville said she believes Howington will interarct well with Newport’s community groups. The council will vote on Howington’s employment during its Dec. 14 meeting. Read more at the Newport Patch.

Bedford, New Hampshire (population 21,203): Town Manager Russell Marcoux, a Nashua native remembered for his years as alderman and with the Nashua Jaycees, died Thursday evening at Massachusetts General Hospital after being hospitalized with bacterial meningitis, Town Council Chairman Bill Dermody said. Marcoux was hospitalized at Elliot Hospital in Manchester on Oct. 31 and transferred to Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston days later. He died there around 6 p.m. Thursday, Dermody said. He was 64. Meningitis is an inflammation of the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord, and the strain caused by bacteria is the most dangerous form of it, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site. The Dana Foundation lists a number of ways the bacteria can be encountered, including through contaminated foods such as cheese and other dairy products. How Marcoux contracted the illness hasn’t been released, but it wasn’t believed to be contagious. Marcoux worked in the public sector for almost 30 years, with a long history of serving New England municipalities. In Nashua, Marcoux served as a Ward 4 alderman and as alderman-at-large from 1975-84. From 1984-96, he was director of administration for the Gate City. Marcoux also was president of the Greater Nashua Jaycees and president of the Nashua Association for the Elderly. He was town manager in Smithfield, R.I., a town of about 20,000, from 1999-2004 before moving on to serve as town administrator of Derry for 21⁄2 years. Marcoux also served two years as president of the New Hampshire Municipal Association. Marcoux started work as the town manager of Bedford in February 2007. Scanlon said the appreciation for Marcoux’s work showed in the care pages at the hospital where he died. Izbicki recalled the strong rapport he shared with Marcoux when he was chairman. When Marcoux was hospitalized, the Town Council appointed town finance director Crystal Dionne as interim town manager. Before learning of Marcoux’s death, Dermody said he had contacted two outfits to help the council in its search for a professional interim to replace Dionne if an interim had been needed for a longer period. Dermody said Dionne will continue serving in Marcoux’s place for now, and will likely hold the interim position into the middle of December. Dermody said the council will meet Wednesday to begin discussions on how to proceed. Marcoux was a Nashua High School graduate, and he earned a BS and an MBA in administration and finance from the former New Hampshire College, now Southern New Hampshire University. He leaves behind three grown children, grandchildren and his wife, Jeanne, who is executive director of the Nashua Senior Activity Center. Funeral arrangements haven’t been announced. Read more at the New Hampshire Union Leader.

Hutto, Texas (population 17,120): Hutto City Council members in a special called meeting Nov. 10 selected Assistant City Manager David Mitchell to serve as interim city manager effective Jan. 1. The decision was made after the council officially accepted the resignation of City Manager Ed Broussard, who will leave the city at the end of December to take the city manager’s position in Missouri City, Texas. City Council members thanked Broussard for his service and wished him luck in his future career. Mitchell received unanimous support from the council before his appointment and said he looks forward to growing in the role. Mitchell was hired as the assistant city manager in September 2009 after serving for about five years as the assistant city manager for Harker Heights. Read more at Community Impact.

Chowan County, North Carolina (population 14,793): Bertie County manager Zee Lamb was hired Thursday to become Chowan County’s manager beginning Jan. 3. Lamb plans to work through December in Bertie after 11 years on the job. Bertie County lies just across the Chowan River from Chowan County. Lamb becomes the 4th Chowan County manager since 2008. Paul Parker was fired in September after leaving the county during a hurricane emergency. Before him, Peter Rascoe left to manage Southern Shores after two years in the Chowan County job. Rascoe replaced Cliff Copeland who retired under controversy in 2008 after 29 years. When Copleland left, county officials discovered a $29 million reserve fund had been spent to augment the county budget over the years. There were no criminal charges. Chowan County has largely recovered financially but still needs to increase its reserve fund to about $5 million from just over $2 million, Lamb said. While in Bertie, Lamb helped raise that county’s reserve fund to about $6 million from $2 million, he said. The state recommends counties have a reserve fund of 25 percent of its annual budget. Lamb will earn $116,000 annually. Read more at The Virginian-Pilot.

Hugo, Minnesota (population 13,332): The Hugo City Council on Monday approved the appointment of Bryan Bear as the city’s new administrator. Bear, the community development director, has been with Hugo for more than seven years. He will replace Mike Ericson, who is resigning this month after more than a decade with the city. Ericson’s separation with the city is amicable. He said he’s pursuing other opportunities in city government. Bear’s first day as administrator will be Nov. 22. Contract details have been worked out, and as part of his agreement with the city, Bear will continue to perform his current community development duties in addition to administrative ones. Read more on the Pioneer Press.

Lake Forest Park, Minnesota (population 12,598): Lake Forest Park’s interim city administrator Bob Jean, who started Nov. 4, is looking to serve the city during a transition period to a new City Council and mayor before they hire a permanent replacement. Jean, who retired as a city manager after serving in University Place for 15 years between other West Coast and Puget Sound cities, most recently was in Gillette, Wyoming filling in on interim basis. Jean got a call from Mayor Dave Hutchinson who he served on the Association of Washington Cities board with after former city administrator David Cline told Hutchinson he was going to take the city manager’s job in Tukwila. Jean said Hutchinson asked him to focus on three things, the transition to a new City Council and mayor, managing the city under a tight budget and tough economy and helping in the recruitment of a new city administrator. Jean said he’ll be in Lake Forest Park until March if needed but if a new city administrator is hired sooner he’ll turn it over to him or her sooner. Meanwhile the contract with interim finance director Steve Nolen, may be extended at this Thursday’s Council meeting, Jean said. Jean said he’s met all of the Councilmembers and was particularly impressed with their involvement in regional government issues, making sure LFP has been represented at the regional and state level. The mayoral and Council elections show more demands for change from the voters with Mary Jane Goss, Jeff Johnson and Tom French, comfortably in front right now. The political committee LFP Gov Watch endorsed those three candidates and criticized veteran Councilmembers Dwight Thompson and Ed Sterner, who ran for mayor and Council respectively Tuesday, for voting to put the levy lid lift Prop. 1 on the ballot in Aug. 2010. Read more at the Shorline-Lake Forest Park Patch.

Maryville, Missouri (population 11,971): City Manager Matt LeCerf submitted a formal, written resignation to members of the City Council Wednesday morning and later confirmed he is leaving Maryville to accept the position of town administrator in Frederick, Colo., a northern suburb of Denver with a population of about 9,000. LeCerf, who came to Maryville in June 2006 as assistant city manager and assumed the top job a little less than a year later, was hired by the Frederick Town Board from a field of five finalists chosen out of a group of 66 initial applicants. According to the Denver Post, the board fired Town Administrator Derek Todd in May on a 4-2 vote at the conclusion of a three-hour-long “special public meeting.” Required by his contract to give a minimum of four weeks’ notice, LeCerf told the Maryville council he would like to remain on the job through Dec. 26 before leaving to begin his new duties in Frederick. As Maryville’s municipal executive, LeCerf has been responsible for administering an annual budget of around $30 million and supervising a staff of 80 full-time city employees. Though Frederick is similar in size to Maryville, LeCerf said its proximity to Denver means the community faces a different set of challenges related to anticipated rapid population growth over the next few years. While excited about the prospect of helping the city meet those challenges, LeCerf said he will miss Maryville and is proud of the strides the city has made during his administration. Chief among those, he said, was voter approval in 2008 of a half-cent capital improvements sales tax that helped finance reconstruction of portions of Main Street and 16th Street. LeCerf’s tenure also embraced joint efforts with Northwest Missouri State University and Nodaway County Economic Development to bring new industry into the area, such as the Carbolytic Materials Co. plant east of town that began operations in 2009. Other initiatives have included completion of the $2.7 million streetscape project on the courthouse square, a new storm siren system, construction of two new water towers along with various water and sewer infrastructure improvements, and the creation of five miles of paved hiking and biking trails. The 34-year-old LeCerf said he was grateful to the council, city employees and the citizens of Maryville for their support during the early stages of his career. From a personal perspective, LeCerf said he has come to appreciate Maryville as a friendly, safe, family-oriented community where he and his wife, Kate, have enjoyed raising their two young children. Mayor Ron Moss said Wednesday LeCerf’s resignation meant Maryville was “losing a very valuable individual” who has helped expand the scope of City Hall beyond treating water and paving streets. Moss said the city has not yet begun searching for a new city manager but will do so soon. He said he expected LeCerf to play a role in devising the process used to choose his successor. A native of Philadelphia, LeCerf was a community planner in Kingsland, Ga., before coming to Maryville. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Kansas and a master’s degree in public administration from Valdosta State University in Georgia. Read more at the Maryville Daily Forum.

Charlton County, Georgia (population 10,282): A man with over 30 years experience in city and county government will be taking over as Charlton County Administrator in January. Al Crace, recently of Roswell, Georgia, was chosen by a unanimous vote of the county commissioners to replace Steve Nance, who will be retiring at the end of the year. Crace, who also has his own consulting firm, most recently served as the program and assistant city manager in Sandy Springs, Georgia. Prior to that, he worked as county manager in Jackson County, manager of the unified government in Athens-Clarke County, and city manager in Gainesville, Rome, Waycross and Alma, Georgia. Crace will begin working in Charlton County on December 1 and officially assume his duties on January 1. Crace has a Bachelors of Industrial Engineering from Georgia Tech and served as a second lieutenant in the Army Corps of Engineers. Read more at the Charlton County Herald.

Yoakum, Texas (population 7,879): Kevin Coleman, of Kerrville, was hired Tuesday as the new Yoakum city manager. The city council hired him during its monthly meeting. Coleman, who will begin Dec. 12, replaces Calvin Cook, who retired in July. He said he’s enthusiastic about coming to the city. Coleman said Yoakum already has a strong group of committed leaders and he is looking forward to working with them. Mayor Annie Rodriguez said she appreciates Coleman’s enthusiasm and wealth of experience. Rodriguez and members of city council enlisted the help of public executive service company Strategic Government Resources, of Keller, and Alan Taylor, SGR senior vice president, of Georgetown, to help with the recruitment process since June. Coleman was named one of the four finalists from a pool of more than 60 applicants.Rodriguez said she would like for him to focus on economic development and growth. Al Veselka, former Yoakum city manager and current interim manager, will help Coleman transition into the position, according to the mayor. Since 2007, Coleman worked with the City of Kerrville as the director of development services. The University of Kansas graduate said he was most proud of building strong relationships between city officials, builders and members of the community. Prior to working with Kerrville, he was the executive director of the Abilene Habitat for Humanity for nine years. From 1987-90, Coleman was city manager in Dewey, Okla. and from 1986-87, was the administrative aide to the city manager in Lawrence, Kan. He will move to Yoakum with his wife, Brenda Coleman, and two daughters, Lucy and Ella Grace. Read more in the Victoria Advocate.

Orland, California (population 7,265): Gail Wingard will step in as the part-time interim manager of the city of Orland and part of his job will be to hire a permanent replacement. Orland is currently without a city manager after councilors chose not to renew the contract of Paul Poczobut. Wingard was the former city manager of Winters before retirement. He filled an interim management role in Orland many years ago, as well as in Willows and Williams. Orland’s vice mayor, Wade Elliott, said Wingard is “refreshingly direct and pleasant.” Elliott said the contract will include Wingard working 3-4 days a week, as needed, at $60 an hour. This might last up to six months. However, part of his job is to “find his replacement and put himself out of a job,” Elliott said. The goal is to find a good fit for the city of about 7,500 residents, Elliott said. Recruitment can cost tens of thousands of dollars when outside consultants are hired, he continued, so the deal struck with Wingard is quite a bargain. The contract begins Nov. 15. Read more at the Chico Enterprise-Record.

Ipswitch, Massachusetts (population 4,107): Town Manager Bob Markel, who announced last week that he’ll resign Jan. 1, said yesterday that he has accepted a new job in Kittery, Maine. A former mayor of Springfield, Markel was appointed town manager in January 2005, replacing George Howe, who had served in the post for 27 years. Last week, Markel told The Salem News that he had applied for another town manager job this fall and was offered the position, but declined to name the town until a contract was finalized. Markel sent an email to town employees late yesterday afternoon naming Kittery as his new locale. Markel’s resignation comes one year before the expiration of his contract, which selectmen negotiated and renewed this spring. Selectmen have just begun to discuss plans to search for a new town manager; Monday was the first time the board met since receiving Markel’s letter of resignation. With less than two months until Markel leaves, Selectman Bill Craft said appointing an interim town manager is a possibility. When Howe left in 2004, Selectman James Foley filled in as town manager on a volunteer basis for about five months until Markel was hired. Markel’s salary is $122,133 for the current fiscal year. Before to coming to Ipswich, he was the town manager of Norfolk and executive director of the Boston Management Consortium, a nonprofit that works to improve efficiency in city government. He served as mayor of Springfield from 1992 to 1996. Read more at The Salem News.

Ocean View, Delaware (population 1,882): The Town Council unanimously voted to terminate Town Manager Conway Gregory and appointed Finance Director Lee Burbaker as his temporary replacement. Officials say they plan to define the organization structure and job descriptions and find a new town manager. After returning from executive session, Councilman Geoff Christ read a motion saying because Gregory had given notice of his intention not to extend his employment agreement until the expiration of its term it was “in the best interest of the town to terminate the employment agreement without further delay.” Last November, citing personal and professional reasons, Gregory announced he would not extend his contract past its March 2, 2012, expiration date. Gregory’s employment will continue until Nov. 18, or 10 days from the adoption of the motion, at which time Burbaker will serve as acting town manager until someone is hired to fill the position. The termination was without cause, Mayor Gordon Wood said. Gregory said he had no comment until he sought legal advice. The decision comes on the heels of lengthy debate over the University of Delaware’s Institute of Public Administration study, which examined the town’s organizational structure, the job description of the town manager and finance director and the salaries of both positions. Many residents supported the IPA recommendations, while some council members did not. Gregory will get paid, have his health benefits and get payments into his retirement fund until March 2, Wood said. The nearly five years that Gregory has held the position have not been without controversy. Residents openly disagreed with his management of the police department, his election to a Maryland town council and his salary. He also came under fire for driving a town car to and from work to his Denton, Md., home. But Gregory said his time with the town has been productive as he eliminated the spending deficit, helped to complete drainage projects, made improvements in John West Park, and acquired more than $1.5 million in public and private grants. Resident Elaine Birkmeyer said she is happy with the decision. Resident George Pickrell said although the decision wasn’t really a shock to him, it was waste of taxpayers’ money since his contract expired in March. Read more at DelMarVaNOW.

Dillon, Colorado (population 904): After four-and-a-half years in the town’s top post, Dillon Town Manager Devin Granbery is moving on. Granbery recently accepted a position as city manager of Sheridan, a role he steps into Dec. 5. His last day with Dillon will be Dec. 2. Granbery’s family is excited to get down to the metro area — Sheridan is near Englewood — as both his and his wife’s families reside there. Granbery is proud of his time in Dillon; he’s happy with his role in the creation of the renewal authority — and its first project, the Pug Ryan’s expansion — seeing the initial phases of the marina plan underway, and the temporary sales tax to help with road reconstruction. Holland doesn’t expect a new manager to be in place for at least three months. This upcoming Tuesday, council will vote to enter into a contract with a search firm to find Granbery’s replacement, along with the terms for interim managers. Holland has suggested two to act as co-managers in Granbery’s place for the time being: treasurer Carri McDonnell and police chief Joe Wray. Before his time in Dillon, Granbery was the town administrator for Silverton. Read more at the Summit Daily.


Transitions: Floyd County, GA; Leavenworth County, KS; West Warwick, RI and more

Floyd County, Georgia (population 96,317): County Manager Kevin Poe tendered his resignation today, effective Dec. 4. Jackson County commissioners voted today to name Poe as their new county manager. The Northeast Georgia county lies between Gainesville and Athens, near the area where Poe’s grown children have moved in recent years. Jackson County nearly doubled its population in the past decade, to 60,485 people in 2010. Floyd County’s 6.4 percent growth rate translated to 96,317 people in the 2010 census. There were 64 applicants for the position, which has been vacant four times in the past 10 years. Read more in the Rome News-Tribune.

Leavenworth County, Kansas (population 76,227): It took two rounds of applications and interviews, but Leavenworth County Commission voted Thursday to appoint a former state legislator, Leavenworth native and longtime lawyer as the new county administrator. The decision to offer Patrick Hurley the contract for the position came following a second round of soliciting resumes and conducting interviews. The first round of candidates for the position that Heather Morgan left last year resulted in no candidates that the commission as a whole could agree on or who would take the job. Commission Chairman Clyde Graeber said that changed this time. The commission received a total of 42 applications for the position and narrowed that list down to three finalists, each of which were brought in for a second interview.

Hurley was born and raised in Leavenworth and served as an attorney in the city, Graeber said. In 1975, he was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives in Leavenworth’s 41st District and served for four years, including a stint as House majority leader. He resigned in 1978 when he was nominated to be state’s secretary of administration under Gov. John Carlin. He has more recently served as an attorney with an office in Topeka. Graeber said that list of qualifications and the contacts at the state that Hurley could bring with him certainly guided the commission’s feelings in choosing him for the position. For Hurley, the opening was something of a serendipitous opportunity, as he and his wife still have many friends and relatives in Leavenworth County.

Commissioner John Flower said he was impressed with Hurley’s past, as well as his interest and experience in long-range strategic planning, something that Flower has been pushing the commission to develop for the county. His continued involvement with his longtime home was also a factor for him in the decision making process. Read more at the Leavenworth Times.

West Warwick, Rhode Island (population 29,191): After more than three years as town manager, James H. Thomas has resigned to take a similar position with the Town of Kingston, Mass. Thomas submitted his letter of resignation to the Town Council Wednesday evening after accepting an offer from the Kingston Board of Selectmen earlier in the day. In an interview Thursday, he said it was time for him to move on, acknowledging that his time in West Warwick has been challenging as the town has tried to navigate through financial struggles. Thomas came to West Warwick in June 2008 from Maine where he most recently served as town manager of Old Orchard Beach. He also worked in municipal government in Illinois, Colorado, Utah and Wisconsin. He was one of 37 applicants for the West Warwick position, which became vacant when Wolfgang Bauer was fired for admittedly mismanaging funds related to the Riverwalk Project.

During Thomas’ time in office, the stresses on the town’s finances have been numerous. There was the $10 million the town paid as part of the settlement for survivors and family members of the victims of the 2003 Station nightclub fire. The town was also hit hard by the floods of 2010 and has had to pay to repair roads that were washed out by the waters that spilled from the Pawtuxet River. And cuts in state aid have hurt the bottom line. With the council refusing to raise the property tax rate in the last two years, Thomas has had to cut back on services. He has eliminated nearly four dozen positions in Town Hall during his tenure. The last three years have also been characterized by frequent disagreements over finances with the School Department. The School Committee has filed lawsuits, known as Caruolo actions, against the town to try and secure money to fund education.

Thomas was one of three finalists interviewed by the Kingston Board of Selectmen Sept. 13. He was the only candidate to come back for a second interview. After that interview, which took place in a public meeting Sept. 22, the five-member board unanimously voted to start contract negotiations. Thomas’s last day in West Warwick will be Oct. 28. He starts in Kingston, a town of nearly 13,000 north of Plymouth, on Oct. 31. He will get a raise in his new job. Under the three-year contract with Kingston, his starting salary will be $119,500 plus a $500 monthly car allowance. He is currently paid about $109,500, which includes compensation for not using the town’s health-insurance plan. Thomas said he would keep his home in West Warwick and commute to Massachusetts. Read more at the Providence Journal.

Crestwood, Missouri (population 11,912): The Crestwood Board of Aldermen has appointed Petree Eastman, a former University City assistant city manager, as Crestwood’s new city administrator. After meeting in a closed session near the end of the regular Sept. 27 board meeting, the board approved the appointment 7-0. Eastman will replace Jim Eckrich, who resigned in April to return to his position as director of public services. He will continue as acting city administrator until Eastman takes over in mid- to late October. Currently serving as a consultant to the St. Louis County Municipal League, Eastman previously worked at University City from April 2007 to June 2010. She holds a law degree from St. Louis University, a master’s degree in city planning from the University of California at Berkeley and a bachelor’s degree in business and media studies from Webster University. She is a graduate of Affton High School. Eastman’s legal work included more than five years with the Armstrong Teasdale law firm and work for various Missouri state offices on school desegregation cases. At University City, she worked on sustainable energy practices among many other issues, and with the Muny League she assisted municipalities with examining Ameren Missouri’s rates for street lighting. At the open meeting before their vote, aldermen took the opportunity to question Eastman, who was selected by Mayor Jeff Schlink after a nationwide search. Read more at the South County Times.

Princeton, Illinois (population 7,660): Princeton City Manager Jeff Fiegenschuh has announced his resignation. His last day will be Nov. 11. Fiegenschuh has taken a village administrator’s position in Shorewood, a town near Joliet with a population of 17,000. Fiegenschuh was selected from 100 applicants for the job, which was narrowed to six finalists. Fiegenschuh was one of those six, and along with a couple of other finalists, was asked to return for a second round of interviews before being selected. Fiegenschuh accepted the city manager’s position in Princeton in November 2007. He came to Princeton from Sac City, Iowa. Princeton Mayor Keith Cain said he believes the next step is for the city to contact a search firm to help fill Fiegenschuh’s position. He said it could be anywhere from six weeks to four months to get another city manager in place, but he hopes to have a person in the job before next year’s budget. Read more at the Bureau County Republican.

Kingston, Massachusetts (population 5,591): New Town Administrator Jim Thomas has agreed to terms on a contract. His start date will be Nov. 1. Thomas has signed the contract, the terms of which are not being released until after selectmen sign the hard copy, probably this weekend. A reception for the public to welcome Thomas to Kingston has been scheduled for 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 11, prior to the board meeting at 7 p.m. Read at The Patriot Ledger.

Tucumcari, New Mexico (population 5,363): Tucumcari city commissioners on Thursday morning fired City Manager Bobbye Rose, according to City Clerk Christine Dougherty. Community Development Director Doug Powers has been named interim manager. Rose was terminated on a 3-2 vote. Rose was selected in March 2009 to be the city manager following the dismissal of John Sutherland. Rose and Sutherland are two of the four finalists for the vacant manager position in Lincoln County. Witcher did not give a reason for the dismissal, but said it had “absolutely nothing” to do with her applying to Lincoln County. Rose was making $70,000 annually as the city manager. Powers’ salary was not adjusted for the interim position. Powers is the fourth person to fill the position since January of 2009, counting interim managers. Read more at the Clovis News Journal.

Transitions: Clay County, MO; East Providence, RI; Christianburg, VA and more

Clay County, Missouri (population 221,939): Clay County commissioners praised outgoing County Administrator Alexa Barton’s professionalism, leadership and compassion during her final meeting in that role. After 10 years with Clay County, Barton is moving on to the city administrator position in Grain Valley. Charlie Barr, who has spent 24 years with the county and currently serves as director of parks, recreation and historic sites, will take on the interim administrator job until Barton’s replacement is found. Eastern Commissioner Katee Porter said Barton had accomplished a difficult task: earning Porter’s respect. Compared to Clay County, Porter said the Grain Valley job would probably be “a piece of cake.” Barton read from a statement as she said goodbye to a decade of work. Read more at The Kearney Courier.

East Providence, Rhode Island (population 47,037): Peter Graczykowski, selected candidate for East Providence city manager, has accepted a contract with the city, Mayor Bruce Rogers said in a voicemail early Wednesday afternoon. Rogers said an “agreement will be going to [Graczykowski] today” in the way of a contract. Rogers also said that Graczykowski will be providing his two-week notice to his current employer, the town of Vernon, CT, where he currently serves as human resources director and town administrator. The council chose Graczykowski after holding an executive session after its public interview of another finalist for the position. The council offered Graczykowski a contract the next day. Both sides have been in negotiations regarding salary and benefits until this morning. Read more at the East Providence Patch.

Christianburg, Virginia (population 18,841): After months of debate and some delays, Christiansburg’s appointment of a new town manager ended Tuesday night succinctly and without fireworks. The Christiansburg Town Council looked to one of its own for the hire, voting 4-2 to promote longtime assistant and current interim manager Barry Helms. Helms has been serving as interim town manager since the council asked former Town Manager Lance Terpenny to resign last year. The town received 77 applicants for the position, drawing candidates from 25 states. Springsted, a private search firm with offices in several major U.S. cities including Richmond, was hired by the council for $19,500 to assist with the hiring process. The town council met in numerous closed sessions to interview candidates before narrowing the pool down to Helms and an unnamed candidate employed in Western Virginia. An appointment had been scheduled on recent meeting agendas but was pushed back each time. Though council members have had heated exchanges throughout the process, Tuesday’s appointment lasted all of five minutes. Mayor Richard Ballengee began this portion of the meeting by reading a prepared statement, in which he lauded the town’s decision to work with Springsted on the hiring process, which he called “productive and successful.” Councilman Jim Vanhoozier moved that the council appoint Helms as the new town manager, which was seconded by Vice Mayor Mike Barber. Councilmen Henry Showalter and Cord Hall cast the “no” votes, though no discussion was offered. In previous meetings, the two have expressed wariness that other council members might already have made up their minds on Helms instead of truly validating the process. The vote passed swiftly, and the council moved on to the next agenda item without further discussion. Helms was hired as an administrative assistant in the town manager’s office 17 years ago, and was promoted to assistant town manager when Terpenny became the town manager in 1996. Terpenny served as town manager for 14 years and most recently earned a salary of about $130,000. Terms of Helms’ salary have not yet been disclosed. Tuesday night’s vote made Helms’ appointment effective immediately. Read more at the Roanoke Times.

Lamar County, Georgia (population 18,317): Robert “Bob” Zellner of the Redbone community in south Lamar County is now the county administrator. His hiring came after a brief closed session at a called meeting Sept. 13 at the county administration building. Zellner was at work two days later. His salary was set at $60,000 a year. Zellner, who worked for Lamar from 1983-89 and Upson County from 2006-07, came from his most recent job in Worth County, where he has been since 2009. During his career he has also worked in Hampton and Villa Rica. Read more at the Herald-Gazette.

Dumfries, Virginia (population 18,013): The Dumfries Town Council made Dan Taber’s position as interim town manager permanent last Tuesday. On a 5-0 vote, with Councilman Willie Toney abstaining and Councilwoman Kristin Forrester absent, the council approved a two-year contract for Taber with a yearly salary of $110,000 and no benefits. Taber retired after 37 years with the Prince William County Police Department as one of three assistant chiefs. He holds a master’s degree in public administration. In his role as Dumfries town manager, Taber said stabilizing the town’s approach to government will be one of his top priorities. Taber becomes the Dumfries ninth town manager in 17 years. Taber was hired as the town’s police chief a year ago and has received favorable comments from both citizens and council members since. About six weeks ago he was appointed interim town manager when Kim Alexander left for a manager position in Culpeper. Taber said during the time he has been interim manager, he has been exposed to issues such as zoning, procurement and contracts that he had not dealt with as police chief. Read more at InsideNoVA.com.

Sycamore, Illinois (population 17,519): How long Brian Gregory will be Sycamore’s acting city manager is unknown at this point in time, but the timetable makes no difference for the 10-year Sycamore government veteran who plans to pick up where Bill Nicklas left off. Gregory will take the reigns as city manager Oct. 1 on a temporary basis while the city council conducts a regional search for a permanent replacement. The search – which could include Gregory if he chooses to apply – will not distract the new acting manager, who said he is focused on preparing for the upcoming budget discussions for Fiscal Year 2013. Sycamore Mayor Ken Mundy said the council does not want to draw out the process and is planning a “fairly brief” search process for the permanent city manager. He said discussions are ongoing among council members, but an official announcement for applicants should happen in the near future. The search comes on the heels of Nicklas’ decision to take an associate vice president position at Northern Illinois University. Nicklas will end his 13-year tenure with the city Sept. 30, when there will be a public reception in his honor at the Sycamore Center Council Chambers from 4-6 p.m. Read more at the Daily Chronicle.

Warrenton, Virginia (population 14,634): Warrenton’s new administrator, Jeff Parrott, is already calling the position a good fit, as he juggles multiple long-term projects and gets acquainted with the town. Hired last month to succeed John Freeman, who is moving, Parrott is no stranger to rural living. He was born in Roanoke Rapids and raised on a family farm in Virginia. In college, he was pursuing a degree in public administration when he heeded the call to public service with the Richmond Bureau of Police. Later, he served a tour in the Air Force as an air crew member on B-52 bombers and was an Army reservist. His subsequent work with the federal government was with the CIA, the Federal Aviation Administration and Homeland Security before he retired with 20 years of service. He was assistant county manager in Moore County for a couple of years before deciding to move to this area to be closer to family. Along the way he earned a bachelor’s degree in management and is working on his master’s. Warrenton Mayor Walter Gardner said the town is fortunate to bring in someone with Parrott’s background. Parrott is busying himself with getting to know the many aspects of his new job including the town’s budget and its people. In addition, he said he is looking at ways to make things more effective and efficient, and bring businesses to Warrenton that would thrive here. Parrott is working closely with the town’s revitalization committee on the Small Town Main Street program, which kicks off here next week, and getting ready for next month’s Harvest Market. He is also looking to capitalize on the historic nature of Warrenton as it relates to tourism and attracting new people who want to retire in a small town atmosphere. Married with four sons, Parrott lives at Lake Gaston. Read more at VANCnews.com.

Woodhaven, Michigan (population 12,875): City Administrator Kyle Tertzag has resigned. The City Council voted unanimously to accept Tertzag’s resignation and a separation agreement at the regularly scheduled meeting Tuesday. Neither the resignation letter, nor details of the separation agreement have been made public. Tertzag was not at the meeting. Mayor Patricia Odette said she wanted to thank Tertzag for his dedication to the city of Woodhaven and wishes him the best in his future endeavors. The council voted unanimously at a special meeting Aug. 22 to place Tertzag on paid leave until Tuesday’s meeting. According to city officials, Tertzag was not allowed in City Hall during the leave. A box of his belongings was removed from his office and placed behind the city clerk’s desk. His photo and biographical information were removed from the city website by the morning of Aug. 24. Deputy Police Chief Robert Harabedian told The News-Herald Newspapers the Police Department was not conducting any investigation while Tertzag was on paid leave. Odette appointed Tertzag as city administrator Dec. 1, 2009, while he was still an Allen Park councilman. He was a substitute teacher before beginning the job Dec. 2, 2009. While working in Woodhaven, Tertzag remained an Allen Park councilman until March 15, when he submitted a letter of resignation to the council. His first term on the Allen Park council began in 1995. Tertzag graduated from Saginaw Valley State University July 14 as a Michigan certified public manager. He had been taking online and evening classes for about a year. He gave a speech at the commencement ceremony last month. Odette congratulated him at a July 19 council meeting for becoming a certified public manager. Read the story on the News-Herald.

Milton, Delaware (population 2,576): Under a figurative cloud cast by an ailing state of financial affairs and legal woes, town officials announced July 25 that the next town manager in Milton would be Wilmer “Win” Abbott, the chief executive for the town of Fenwick Island. The choice fills a year-long void created by the abrupt departure of George Dickerson, the former town manager who is suing the town and the mayor and several members of the Town Council over circumstances of his suspension last September and subsequent firing earlier this year in March. For town officials, Abbott’s arrival is timely, starting his new job Friday, a day after a workshop to review a fourth draft of the town’s proposed $1.48 million fiscal-year budget for 2012 that officials are grappling to balance. The budget year starts in two weeks, Oct. 1. Abbott is modest, a salesman-turned-politician-turned-municipal servant with a head for numbers and a knack for attracting funding sources and building bridges — just what town leaders need. Most of all, he considers himself skilled at striking a delicate balance between leadership and subservience. And while he’s adept at employing tactics that pull together departments and funding sources, he’s not about to lay out a vision for Milton before his start date and a formal nod from Mayor Cliff Newlands and the six-member council. Newlands counts Abbott’s management style and knowledge of finance and politics among desired assets. The mayor would not discuss Abbott’s salary, but acknowledged that the immediate past town manager earned $70,000 a year. Abbott will supervise an accounting staff, a project coordinator who heads code enforcement and public works. To save money, Milton elected officials are leaning against filling the vacancy left by town clerk Stephanie Coulbourne who resigned in June to start a business. “We would be saving money –$62,000 for the clerk’s job,” Newlands said. Abbott became a municipal hire in 2009, after former Fenwick Island Town Manager Tony Carson moved on to do the job in Berlin. Read more at DelMarVaNOW.com.