Transitions: Hollywood, FL; Rockingham County, NC; Lake Worth, FL and more

Hollywood, Florida (population 140,768): After a tumultuous year, Hollywood has a new leader. Douglas Hewett, the assistant city manager of Fayetteville, N.C., was selected by the City Commission Friday night to be Hollywood’s new city manager. On the to-do list for the new manager: begin the budget process for next fiscal year; develop a strategic plan for economic development, help heal rifts with the city’s police, firefighters and city employees’ unions, help rebuild a struggling downtown and address the city’s problems with homelessness. The city has been without a manager since June, when Cameron Benson quit under pressure after commissioners learned the city was $10.3 million in the hole. Interim City Manager Cathy Swanson-Rivenbark was asked to serve as the interim, leading the city through this year’s budget which included a $38 million gap. Other challenges this year: a referendum that slashed pension benefits for employees and a major sewer pipe rupture caused by old infrastructure. Commissioner Beam Furr said the city has come a long way this year, but needs to continue to improve. Hewitt, 40, has no experience as a city manager. During his presentation, Hewett, who grew up in North Carolina and earned both a bachelor’s and master’s from North Carolina State University, said that being from a different state could be an advantage. In North Carolina, he was in charge of environmental services, sanitation, engineering and infrastructure, transit, human resources development, and the human resources department. He also worked a program commissioners hope he can develop in Hollywood that deals with residential renting. Hewett said he has learned as assistant manager that you have to look for ways to say yes. He has been the assistant city manager of Fayetteville, a city of 200,000, since 2007. Read more at The Miami Herald.

Rockingham County, North Carolina (population 93,643): In his first month on the job, Rockingham County’s new manager spent a lot of time at the conference table in his office — not the ample, executive-style desk across the room. Lance Metzler said he’s trying to send two messages: He has no personal agenda and his door is always open to residents with problems or questions involving county government. Metzler took the reins of county government Dec. 5, after the county Board of Commissioners hired him to fill the shoes of veteran manager Tom Robinson, who retired last year after nearly a decade in the role. Metzler, 41, will be paid $132,500 a year and get a car allowance of $600 per month. He came to the job from Montgomery County, where he served as that county’s chief executive for seven years. Montgomery, where Metzler grew up, boasts a population of about 27,500 residents — less than a third that of Rockingham County’s. But Metzler faced some of the same issues there as those he’ll confront at Governmental Center in Wentworth. And he performed admirably during his tenure, said Jackie Morris, chairman of the Montgomery board. Metzler got his start as a manager in Kingstree, S.C., where, at 23 he was the youngest town manager in the state. Later, he served as chief administrator in Virginia for another small town and for Northampton County in the Eastern Shore area. Metzler’s accomplishments in Montgomery County since 2005, Morris said, include helping to form a partnership with neighboring Moore County to build a 3,000-acre business park on the county line, the Heart of North Carolina MegaPark. Rockingham County faces a tough budget year in 2012, with some revenue sources likely stagnant. But the finances appear well-managed, Metzler said, with little pressing need to spend heavily on such projects as new buildings. Deciding what to do and when will be up to the commissioners, he said. Metzler said that he and his fiance, Gwen Roseman, are looking forward to forming a blended family when she moves here from Wilmington, where she works as a flight attendant. They each have two school-age children from previous marriages. Metzler said that in his short time on the job, he has gained confidence that he made a good choice in coming to Rockingham County. He’s hoping county residents feel the same way about him. Read more at the News & Record.

Lake Worth, Florida (population 34,910): After a plethora of media coverage by local news outlets, including several stories featured in the Palm Beach Post, it’s hardly breaking news that transgendered Lake Worth City Manager Susan Stanton was fired from her job last month. The 3-2 vote in favor of her dismissal has brought with it its fair share of controversy in the local press, and the motives behind the firing itself are still murky according to two of the commissioners.  And even a third commissioner, newly elected Andy Amoroso who voted to oust Stanton, is rather tightlipped on the issue despite his supposedly “friendly” dealings with her for the better part of two years. So just why was she let go?  Was it budgetary?  Was it something more sinister, more politically motivated? The answers are anything but easily defined at this point.  But a few things about the firing are known with certainty:  it wasn’t due to performance, had nothing to do with her choice of gender orientation and came as a shock, even to some of the commissioners. Lake Worth City Commissioner Christopher McVoy, one of the two commissioners who voted not to fire Stanton, was more than willing to speak to SFGN despite vacationing in Vermont and painting a house when receiving the call. Perhaps even more telling?  The way the vote and subsequent firing was conducted. City Commissioner Scott Maxwell raised the motion to fire Stanton. Maxwell, according to McVoy has been an outspoken opponent of Stanton since the beginning of her tenure in 2009. Nine months ago Former Mayor Rene Varela, criticized Stanton’s people skills in an evaluation and even she agreed she needed to make more of an effort to reach out to the community. But still:  how important was her demeanor to the city’s financial well-being as a whole? Well, for one, Lake Worth City Commissioner Suzanne Mulvehill, who did not vote to fire Statnton, seems to agree with McVoy’s assessment of her dismissal. In fact when it comes to job performance, according to Mulvehill, Stanton helped the city balance a budget with precision. Despite having to compensate for nearly $10 million in lost revenues from 2008 to present, Stanton was not only up to the job but ensured that, before the newest elections, the city of Lake Worth had a completely balanced budget.  Additionally, just nine months ago Stanton received a favorable evaluation – besides some minor criticisms — from the then city commission. Going further, Mulvehill not only asserts her belief that Stanton was fired for personal reasons, but claims Maxwell, who is also vice mayor, had even further motivation to flex his political muscle. Yet another twist to the still unraveling controversy is Commissioner Andy Amoroso’s comments on the vote.  Openly gay and part of the majority vote to fire Stanton, Amoroso stated that he is not a “traditional” politician and had little to say about the matter. Amoroso is new to the commission only having been elected in November. Curiously enough Stanton, who could not be reached for comment, maintains a Facebook Page pointing her “interests” to Amoroso’s election site adding further credence to their obvious acquaintanceship prior to the election.  Under questioning, though, Amoroso declined to comment about he and Stanton’s prior dealings and reverts methodically back to a seemingly pre-packaged response. Remember, though:  while Amoroso points to the public being the harbinger for the ousting, it was motioned during the meeting that the public be confined simply to saying goodbye to Stanton and thanking her for her service.  How then could it be said with accuracy that there could potentially be a myriad of reasons for Stanton’s firing – the most relevant of which was public opinion? Commissioner Mulvehill feels that the meeting to fire Stanton had potentially been planned in advance with only certain people knowing, which if true, would violate Florida’s Sunshine Laws. Those laws state that fellow commissioners are not allowed to converse about anything with each other related to policy, voting, procedure or anything else relevant to the city. One thing though that does seem certain is that Stanton was not fired because she is transgender as happened with her last job as city manager of Largo, Florida. Tony Plakas, the executive director of Compass, the gay and lesbian center of the Palm Beaches, said this is just the way things happen in Lake Worth. Read more at SFGN.com.

Carbondale, Illinois (population 25,902): Kevin Baity will become Carbondale’s next city manager pending formal approval of a contract by the city council. The city council will host a special meeting at 7 p.m. Jan. 10 in Carbondale’s civic center to vote on the contract for Baity, who has been assistant city manager and development services director. The city did not provide contract information in the Wednesday afternoon announcement. Mayor Joel Fritzler said contract details have not been finalized. Former City Manager Allen Gill made more than $120,000 in 2011. Gill officially retired Jan. 1, after three years on the job. Baity beat out former Collinsville City Manager Robert Knabel to replace Gill as the city’s top administrator. Baity has worked for the city of Carbondale since 2006. Baity said in his first few months in office he will focus on Carbondale’s upcoming fiscal year budget, rewriting the zoning code and the city’s five-year capital improvement plans. He said he will not try to put his own stamp on the job. Fritzler said Baity’s administrative experience with the city will allow the new city manager to hit the ground running when he is formally installed. Baity bested more than 60 candidates from a nationwide search that cost the city about $23,000. Baity’s impending hire has at least two city council members at odds with each other. Councilwoman Jane Adams came out in opposition to Baity being awarded the job, while Councilman Lance Jack described Adams’ opposition as “self-absorbed.” Adams said she had no problem with Baity as a person, but she did not think he was the best candidate for the job. She took issue with the wording of the city’s news release about the council reaching “a consensus” on the hire. Adams also criticized Baity’s handling of a special use permit issued to an auto repair shop located at North Oakland Avenue and West Sycamore Street, in a neighborhood zoned residential. Baity said he would not comment on the special use permit, since rescinded. Although Baity didn’t get unanimous support, it’s tough to tell if other council members were opposed. The city council discusses personnel matters, which includes hiring, behind closed doors, and council members are barred from discussing what happens in those closed sessions. If any council members have issues with the hire they will be able to publicly address those issues at the Jan. 10 meeting. For now, a majority expressed support for Baity. Councilman Don Monty said Baity erred on the special use permit, but it should not disqualify Baity from being hired as city manager. Monty said he hoped differences over Baity’s hire would not affect future council business. Fritzler said Adams is entitled to her opinion, and opinions on Baity’s hire are similar to dissents on other candidates. Read more at The Southern.

McKeesport, Pennsylvania (population 19,731): McKeesport has a new city administrator. At its reorganization meeting Monday, council chose Matt Gergely to replace city administrator Dennis Pittman, who had held the top city management position for eight years. Mr. Gergely, 32, grew up in White Oak and recently moved to McKeesport. He was a supervisor with the State Workers’ Insurance Fund. He earned a bachelor’s degree in communications from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. His salary will be $66,500. McKeesport’s city administrator is similar to a municipal manager. The administrator also leads the city’s finance department. Mr. Pittman, 63, was community development director in McKeesport from 1989 to 2000. From 2000 to 2004, he was executive director of McKeesport Housing Corp. In 2004, former Mayor Jim Brewster hired him as city administrator, and when Councilman Regis McLaughlin became mayor, he kept Mr. Pittman in the job. Mr. Pittman has been known to be an independent thinker who would disagree with his employers when he believed the issue called for his impartiality. Councilman A.J. Tedesco said Mr. Pittman was an asset to the city for many years. Read more at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Hope Mills, North Carolina (population 15,176): The Hope Mills Board of Commissioners voted to fire Town Manager Randy Beeman in a 3-2 vote Wednesday night. Finance Director John Ellis was appointed interim town manager. Board members Mike Mitchell, Tonzie Collins and Jerry Legge voted for Beeman’s dismissal. Pat Edwards and Bob Gorman voted to retain the manager. Under Beeman’s contract, he will be paid for the next 60 days. Mitchell, who was elected in November, made the motion to fire Beeman but first read a statement. Mitchell cited concerns over budgeting, personnel policies and relationships with nonprofit agencies. A closed session was on Wednesday’s meeting agenda, but the board voted to fire Beeman before going behind closed doors. Collins criticized the timing, saying later that Beeman could have kept his job with a reprimand if the board had first discussed the issue behind closed doors. In a statement, Collins apologized to the citizens of Hope Mills for Beeman’s termination. Beeman has been under fire since June 2010, when recorded conversations between him and other town employees were leaked to Eddie Dees, who was mayor. On the recordings, Beeman criticized some town officials. He later apologized for his comments and survived a 3-2 vote to fire him in October 2010. The New Hanover County District Attorney’s Office investigated the recordings, and last month the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office charged former administrative assistant Melissa Smith with a misdemeanor. Town commissioners raised their voices as they gave their reasons for supporting Beeman or wanting to fire him. Legge seconded Mitchell’s motion to fire Beeman. Mayor Jackie Warner, who doesn’t have a vote on the board, said she was handing over her mayoral duties to Mitchell, the mayor pro tem, for a moment as she expressed her displeasure with the action. Warner said the matter of Beeman’s job performance should have been more fully reviewed before any action was taken. Three of the five commissioners and Warner were elected in November and sworn in last month. Beeman sat silently during the discussion and left immediately after the vote. Town Hall was packed for the meeting. Before the vote, a few people took to the podium to express support for Beeman. Ellis, the finance director, was named interim manager after the board emerged from a closed session that lasted more than an hour. After the meeting Ellis, 55, said he is ready to get busy learning the manager’s job. He was hired by a 4-1 vote, with Collins voting no. Ellis’ salary will be the same as Beeman’s, Warner said, about $87,000. Warner said the search for a permanent manager could take two to three months. Read more at The Fayetteville Observer.

Red Bluff, California (population 14,076): City Manager Martin Nichols will be leaving Red Bluff to become the chief administrative officer in Lassen County. Nichols will be leaving as soon as Lassen County finishes performing a background check, Deputy City Clerk Cheryl Smith said. Nichols was not immediately available for comment. He has served as city manager since 2006 and lives in Paradise. Mayor Forrest Flynn said Nichols’ expertise will be missed. The Red Bluff City Council will hold a closed session meeting Saturday to discuss recruiting for a new city manager. Several options are available for the council in filling the position, Flynn said. It can appoint a department head staff or someone from the community to the position, open a recruitment process or hire a consulting firm to do the recruiting. The city does not have any money to hire a consulting firm, and Flynn said he would be in favor of having an open recruitment, Flynn said. Most likely the council will appoint an interim manager while it looks for a permanent person. Having one of the five council members step into the role will not be an option. Read more at the Red Bluff Daily News.

St. Helens, Oregon (population 12,883): After four years helping guide the city of St. Helens, its city administrator will leave his position at the end of this month. Chad Olsen accepted a job as city manager for Carlton, Ore., a small Yamhill County farming town. He begins there Feb. 1 with a salary of $72,000. In St. Helens this year, Olsen was making nearly $106,000 before benefits. Olsen was a finalist to become city manager of Molalla, Ore., earlier this year. Olsen currently lives in McMinnville, about 15 minutes south of Carlton. To become Carlton’s city manager, Olsen beat out a group of 64 applicants, according to McMinnville’s News-Register, who quoted Olsen as calling Carlton is “a real gem, with a classic, small-town atmosphere.” He was hired Dec. 12. Olsen was city manager of Rainier for 11 years before resigning and joining St. Helens in 2007, first in an interim role. The St. Helens City Council plans to discuss the soon-to-be-vacant administrator position at its Jan. 4 work session. They will first appoint someone as interim. Olsen has a long history in city administration, including work in Ohio, Wyoming and North Carolina. He is a member of both the St. Helens Kiwanis Club and the Rotary Club of Columbia County. Read more at the South County Spotlight.

Richmond Hill, Georgia (population 9,281): Shortly after swearing in two new members Tuesday, the new Richmond Hill City Council decided to “relieve” City Manager Mike Melton of his duties. Mayor Harold Fowler says the decision was not based on anything Melton had or had not done, but was because the council felt in order to move in a new direction they needed to get rid of Melton, who’s served in the position for 15 years. Mayor Fowler has worked with Melton for the past two years and feels the council made the right decision to move the City of Richmond Hill forward. Melton has five days to appeal the council’s decision, followed by up to 45 days for a hearing. Mayor Fowler says he and city council have no one in mind at this time to replace Melton. Read more at WTOC.

Atkinson, New Hampshire (population 6,751): William Innes had a busy first day as town administrator. Innes, 63, said he had nonstop meetings yesterday in an effort to get to know his new coworkers and staff. Innes agreed to take the job in December after the town had been without a town administrator since August. His annual salary is $68,000. He was the chairman of the Recreation Committee and secretary of the Technology Committee, but has no other municipal experience. Selectman Fred Childs said the next few weeks will be a learning process for Innes. Right now is an extremely busy time for the town, Childs said, with the town report, budgets and warrant articles. Last night was Innes’ first selectmen’s meeting, but Childs said he won’t be doing much during meetings yet. Innes worked half the day at Town Hall and half at home because he is recovering from a medical issue. But he said it isn’t holding him back. Town Clerk Rose Cavalear said she met Innes yesterday morning when he came in. Atkinson has gone through a number of short-term administrators in the past few years. The last town administrator, Philip Smith, left in August after less than two years on the job. Before Smith was hired in September 2009, the town went seven months without an administrator, after Steven Angelo quit after just five months. Before him was interim administrator Craig Kleman, who worked on the job for about four months. Russell McCallister lasted the longest, working for about three and a half years before quitting in January 2008. But Innes said he plans to stay in the position for five to seven years before retiring. He worked for 39 years as an engineer and manager at various computer companies before being laid off. He worked part-time with children who have learning disabilities at Hampstead Middle School and only left the position to work at Town Hall. Todd Barbera, chairman of the budget and technology committees, said he knows Innes well from his time serving on committees with him. Innes said besides the constant meetings this week, he hopes to learn as much as possible about his new position. Read more at the Eagle-Tribune.

Hatfield, Massachusetts (population 2,718): Town Administrator Jeffrey Ritter is leaving to become municipal chief of the northern Worcester County town of Templeton. Ritter, who held the Hatfield job for two years, will step down on Jan. 17, according to a published report in the Daily Hampshire Gazette. Hatfield Selectman Marcus Boyle told the Northampton newspaper that Ritter did “a terrific job” for the short time he managed the Hampshire County town. The departure of Ritter, which coincides with Hatfield’s annual budget-making process, marks a “significant loss” for the town, Boyle said. The Gazette said Ritter cited an easier commute among the reasons for taking the Templeton job, which is much closer to his Harvard home than Hatfield. During Ritter’s tenure, Hatfield kept up with the times by creating a town website, which the outgoing official championed as a more efficient way to reach the town’s 3,000-plus residents. The Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee will hold a joint meeting on Tuesday at 6 p.m. at Memorial Town Hall, though it was unclear if the administrator position is among the topics to be discussed at the session. A meeting agenda was not immediately available online. Hired by the Board of Selectmen, the town administrator is responsible for handling Hatfield’s day-to-day affairs, including implementation of policies set by the board. The administrator also “serves as the friendly face of government,” according to the town’s website. Read more at MassLive.com.

Grand Lake, Colorado (population 629): David Hook of Flagstaff, Ariz., who was on the town’s “short list” of potential employees during the hiring process, said Grand Lake Mayor Judy Burke, is scheduled to start work in Grand Lake’s Town Hall on Feb. 27. A New Jersey native, Hook has been living in Flagstaff for about 18 years, most recently employed as a project manager for Northern Arizona University. An engineer, Hook was employed at a civil engineering firm prior to his position at NAU, but the firm closed its office due to the economy, he said. In past positions, Hook was a city engineer at two communities, Greenfield, Ind., and Noblesville, Ind., was the public works director in Douglas, Ariz., and was the town engineer and water utility director in Oro Valley, Ariz. Parents of four grown children and grandparents of two, Hook and wife Cathie are familiar with Grand Lake, having visited the area several times with Cathie’s family. Flagstaff is situated at 7,000 feet in elevation and is a mountain resort community with a nearby ski resort and pine forests. Hook fills the position left by former town manager Shane Hale, who accepted a job in Cortez on Aug. 30. Hale was employed with the town for seven years. Read more at Sky Hi Daily News.

Transitions: Glendale, CA; Rockingham County, NC; Oviedo, FL and more

Glendale, California (population 205,952): Monrovia City Manager Scott Ochoa has been appointed to the same position with the city of Glendale, the city announced Tuesday. Ochoa takes over for current Glendale City Manager Jim Starbird, a former Monrovia city manager himself who is stepping down at the end of the year. Ochoa will officially take over the job on Jan. 3, 2012, according to a Glendale city spokesman. Ochoa said in an interview Tuesday night that his departure will be “bittersweet.” Ochoa started as an intern in Monrovia in 1993, working his way up the ladder until he was appointed to the city manager position in 2004. A graduate of Claremont McKenna College, Ochoa obtained a master’s degree in public administration from USC while working for Monrovia. Glendale Mayor Laura Friedman said in a prepared statement that Ochoa was selected because of his impressive “credentials, his values, his track record and multi-dimensional understanding of local government and municipal operations.” In terms of population, Ochoa’s leap from Monrovia to Glendale is enormous. Glendale is more than five times the size of Monrovia. Ochoa will also take charge of a much larger city work force. About 1,800 employees work for Glendale, compared to approximately 300 in Monrovia. Ochoa said his experience would translate, however, because the city faces many of the same challenges–economic development, declining revenue–that he’s faced here. Ochoa’s salary is still being negotiated, according to the Glendale News-Press. Ochoa currently makes about $182,000 per year in Monrovia, not including benefits and bonuses. Starbird makes about $240,000 annually, the News-Press reports. Ochoa said he was approached by a Glendale executive recruiter in September and has been going through the application process since. He tendered his resignation at the Monrovia City Council meeting Tuesday and will stay on as city manager until Jan. 2, 2012, he said. Ochoa said he plans on moving to Glendale as soon as the real estate market allows. He lives in Monrovia with his wife Sophia Ochoa and their children Nicolas, 14, and Tessia, 10. Read more at the Montrose Patch.

Rockingham County, North Carolina (population 93,643): There is a new man in charge in one Triad County and he may be a familiar face to some. Tuesday, the Rockingham County Board of Commissioners appointed Lance L. Metzler as new county manager, who is currently the county manager in Montgomery County. Metzler’s qualifications to serve as the chief executive officer of Rockingham County Government include many years of professional experiences, visionary leadership, and governmental innovations. In a news release the county said Metzler will begin work December 5. Since 2005, as county manager for the County of Montgomery, some of his top accomplishments are the following: the first Strategic Plan for the County; the first official Capital Improvement Plan; a team approach for operations and long-term planning; and a pro-active approach to growth and customer service in a diverse community. He served as county administrator/manager for the County of Northampton, VA, between 2000 and 2005. Some of the milestone accomplishments included: first Sustainable Technology Industrial Park in the nation; a new County facility to house County services; collaborative efforts for regionalism to address housing, water and sewer needs; aggressive Land Use Plans; and Distinguished Budget Awards. As town manager for the Town of West Point, VA, from 1997 to 2000, his accomplishments included hiring and developing qualified department heads with teamwork philosophy; an industrial park; a Farmer’s Market; a Bikeway and Scenic Vista; a historical walking tour; a police department; an Emergency Operation Program; and Wastewater Treatment and Airport service development through regional efforts. Metzler also worked for the Town of Kingstree, SC, and the Town of Troy, NC. He has been featured in numerous governmental magazines, publications, and productions; is a credentialed International City/County Manager’s Association (ICMA) Manager; and is actively involved with city/county governmental associations. In addition, he was charter president of the West Point Rotary Club, a member of Seven Lakes Baptist Church, and a Pi Kappa Phi Alumni. Metzler has an undergraduate degree in Urban/Regional Planning at East Carolina University and is currently completing a master’s in Public Administration from Old Dominion University. He has done graduate work at Virginia Tech along with UNC-Chapel Hill’s Public Executive Leadership Academy (PELA), and the University of Virginia’s Senior Executive Institute (SEI). Read more at WFMY News 2.

Oviedo, Florida (population 33,342): After an extensive internal search, city officials have made a decision in appointing a new city manager. At a special meeting on Oct. 20, the Oviedo City Council voted unanimously to offer the city manager position to Kathryn Breazeale. Breazeale is a familiar face to the city, as she has been the active budget officer since December of 2010. Breazeale has previously served in several positions that qualify her for the responsibilities that come with a position such as city manager. Serving as the director of administrative services for the city of Wilmington, North Carolina, Breazeale will enter this position with a vast knowledge of city affairs. With a master’s degree in public administration, more than eight years of progressively responsible local government experience and four years in the private industry as a CFO, the city council’s decision was made based on merit and experience. Additionally, the city is also still in pursuit of a financial director. The position is open and all qualified candidates are urged to apply. The finance director is part of the city manager’s senior management team that performs a variety of professional, supervisory and technical accounting and finance work, according to city documents announcing the position. The guidelines express that an ideal candidate will possess a bachelor’s degree from an accredited university or college in accounting or business administration and also have at least five years of experience in finance administration and government fund accounting. The city is also looking for someone who has been in a similar position before, serving as either a director or assistant director in a larger organization. Pay for this kind of position ranges between $90,000 to $100,000 in annual salary, according to the release. Read more at the Seminole Chronicle.

Belmont, Massachusetts (population 24,729): Belmont’s Board of Selectmen announced Monday night that Town Administrator Thomas Younger has tendered his resignation, effective Nov. 18, after serving in the job since 2005. It was an amicable split, said Selectman Ralph Jones, the board’s chairman, and had been planned for a while. Jones said the selectmen held off announcing Younger’s departure because he was a finalist for town manager spots in Winchester and North Andover. He was not selected for either position. In a statement, the selectmen thanked Younger and wished him well. Jones said that the selectmen are looking for an interim town administrator, whom they hope to have in place by the end of the month. They have already begun contacting possible candidates, though Jones declined to name them. Read more at the Boston Globe.

Elk River, Minnesota (population 22,974): The city’s new administrator is running things for the first time — after apprenticeships spanning two decades in other Minnesota communities. Others might have seen a city with a high tax rate and a decrease in property values. But Elk River’s new city administrator sees “a jewel.” Elk River is the Sherburne County seat and the second-largest city (after St. Cloud) in what has been Minnesota’s fastest-growing county for much of the past decade. It is a city of possibilities — from its quaint Main Street and cozy downtown district to the superstores that straddle Hwy. 169. It is the one community within a rural county that has access to several major arteries, with Minneapolis just 30 miles away. For Portner, it’s a dream job. Of course, this is a guy who, years ago, savored spending a day in a small western Minnesota city, observing as officials talked about trying to develop around a post office. He grew up in New Ulm unsure where his future would take him. But he was always observant — even of things others took for granted. New Ulm was a city that took care of itself, he recalled. The yards were manicured, the streets clean. He went to the University of Minnesota and landed an internship with then-U.S. Rep. Jim Ramstad. Portner had considered a teaching career. Then he began meeting police chiefs, school superintendents and city officials. After earning a master’s degree at Hamline University, Portner learned in 1991 that Brooklyn Park was looking for an assistant to its city manager. He spent six years working in what was then Minnesota’s fifth-largest city. He later moved to Plymouth, another large suburb, and served as the city’s administrative services director. He felt fulfilled in Plymouth but jumped at the chance to go to Elk River. The city initially offered the job to Kevin Lahner, city administrator in Burlington, Wis. When Lahner declined, Elk River chose Portner to succeed Lori Johnson, who resigned and is now city administrator in Otsego. There were 71 applicants for the job that Portner ultimately got. He and his wife, Penny, a Forest Lake teacher, live in Andover, a location that creates a 20-mile commute for each of them. They have two daughters and a son. In spite of a 45.7 percent tax rate and a 5.6 percent decrease in property values, Elk River has tremendous potential, he said. With the levy, there’s an additional 3 percent tax increase, he said. But the positives far outweigh the economic climate. Read more at the Star Tribune.

Leland, North Carolina (population 13,527): Leland’s new town manager, David A. Hollis, begins work at his new post on Tuesday. He succeeds William B. Farris, who will retire December 16 after more than 30 years of municipal work experience, five of which he served as Leland town manager. Hollis is a licensed engineer, who previously worked for North Carolina engineering firm, W.K. Dickson and Company. He also has served as chief project engineer for New Hanover County and as the superintendent-plant manager for Brunswick County’s Water Resources department. The Leland resident was the chairman of the town’s planning board and a member of the Leland Code Rewrite Committee, which has led revisions of the town’s ordinances. He was appointed to both groups in 2008, but resigned when he accepted the position as town manager, said Carol Ann Floyd, Leland town clerk. The town received 34 applications for the town manager position. The town council and Mayor Walter Futch led the hiring process. Hollis will receive an annual salary of $95,000 and will receive a $300 monthly vehicle allowance. Read more at the Greater Wilmington Business Journal.

Grand County, Utah (population 9,225): The Grand County Council will be without an administrator beginning Nov. 18. Council members approved 4-2 a resolution last week to exercise the council’s right not to renew the county council administrator’s employment agreement based on “restructuring of the position.” Melinda Brimhall, the current council administrator, said the decision was mutual. Brimhall said the discussions about the status and future of her job began a year ago, after what she referred to as significant personal attacks against her from a number of county elected officials. Brimhall is the seventh administrator to be hired by the county since citizens voted in 1992 to change the form of county government. Brimhall assumed the role of county council administrator in the fall of 2009, after working as a management analyst in the city manager’s office in Casa Grande, Ariz. At the time she was hired, Brimhall made a verbal commitment to stay for two years, she said. Council chairman Chris Baird said at the Oct. 18 meeting that ending Brimhall’s contract is a mutually beneficial decision. He added that the county will restructure the position to better conform to modern state codes. Council members Audrey Graham and Ken Ballantyne voted against the action, stating their disappointment with the county council for allowing the problems between the council administrator and other elected officials to reach this point. Baird offered his appreciation to Brimhall during the meeting and said it was a “tough decision” all around. Brimhall said she is not sure what her next step will be, but she will be leaving the Moab area after completing her final month as council administrator. She will be given six months’ severance pay as part of the agreement. Read more at the Moab Times-Independent.

Rockwood, Tennessee (population 5,705): Rockwood City Council has offered the city administrator’s job to Jack Miller, Crossville’s former top official. Miller received the nod over former Roane County Executive Mike Farmer in a 4-2 vote during a special session Monday, Mayor James Watts said Tuesday. Former Morgan County Executive Becky Ruppe also applied for the city administrator’s post, to be vacated soon by Jim Hines, who is retiring. Watts said he will meet with Miller this week to negotiate a contract and salary, and council will be asked later this month to approve the pact. The job was advertised at $50,000 annually, Watts said. Watts said Miller has a work record that includes extended stints as city manager in several cities. Miller was abruptly fired in January 2008 by the Crossville City Council through a prepared resolution that stated he wasn’t “performing up to desired standards,” according to published reports. Hines, 66, announced plans to retire several weeks ago. Hines, who also performs the duties of city building official and city recorder, said he may stay on as a contract employee to continue to do the building official’s duties. Read more at the Knoxville News Sentinel.

Minden, Nebraska (population 2,923): Matthew Cederburg has accepted the position of City Administrator/Finance Director for the City of Minden. Cederburg, who was recently hired as City Clerk/Treasurer  for the city in June, 2011, was offered the opportunity at the October 12 City Council special meeting and will immediately make the transition into his new position. The formal swearing in of Cederburg will be at the November 7, 2011 City Council meeting. Cederburg fills the administrator position that has been vacant since early summer. Read at The Minden Courier.

Hickman, Nebraska (population 1,657): Silas Clarke of Omaha has been hired as the new city administrator for Hickman. Clarke replaces Brett Baker, who resigned in May to become Seward’s new city administrator. Clarke will begin his duties Nov. 14, said Kelly Oelke, Hickman’s finance director and city clerk. Clarke was assistant grant administrator for the city of Omaha and worked as the high schools’ director of the attendance collaborative at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. He also was the capital improvement plan coordinator in Onawa, Iowa. Clarke has a master’s degree in public administration with an emphasis on local government and a bachelor’s degree in political science. Hickman is about 15 miles south of Lincoln. Read more at the Journal Star.